How Do You Deal With Verbally Aggressive People?

What is aggressive body language?

Finger Pointing – Whenever someone points their finger at you directly or even straight up in the air, it’s another sign of aggression.

They really want you to ‘get’ what they’re saying.

Not just the words, but the energy behind it.

Threatening Posture – Spreading feet apart with hands on hips..

What is considered verbal aggression?

Verbal aggression can be defined as deliberately harmful behavior that is typically both unprovoked and repeated. … It is the use of words or gestures to cause psychological harm that differentiates verbal aggression from physical bullying.

What are the side effects of verbal abuse?

The effects of verbal abuse are serious Huemer says that verbal abuse can cause fear, anxiety, depression, stress, PTSD, memory gap disorders, difficulty sleeping, eating problems, hypervigilance, and substance abuse as well as other self-harming behaviors.

Why do I get so angry so fast?

Some common anger triggers include: personal problems, such as missing a promotion at work or relationship difficulties. a problem caused by another person such as cancelling plans. an event like bad traffic or getting in a car accident.

How do you respond to an aggressive person?

At the timeBefore you react, take a deep breath, step back to give the person space and take some time. … Although it can be difficult, try to stay calm. … Make sure you are safe. … If the person’s behaviour is physically violent, try not to show any fear, alarm or anxiety, as this may increase the person’s agitation.More items…•

What causes verbal aggression?

There are four primary reasons or causes suggested by Infante, Trebing, Shepard, and Seeds, which are: Frustration—in which a goal is blocked by someone or having to deal with an individual deemed “unworthy” of one’s time. Social learning—in which the aggressive behavior has been learned from observing other …

How far should you stand from a verbally aggressive person?

Be mindful of where you stand When someone is upset, honor their personal space. Remaining at least 18 inches to 3 feet away is a best practice. In this way, you show respect but also have some distance from the agitated person should the situation worsen (CPI, 2016).

How do you calm an aggressive person down?

Things to remember when dealing with aggressive behaviourBe positive in the way you handle the situation.Stay calm yourself. Don’t appear scared or respond aggressively. … Focus on the issues and not the person. … Maintain non-aggressive body language. … Control your tone of voice. … Give them space.

What do you call a person that gets angry easily?

Irritable, testy, touchy, irascible are adjectives meaning easily upset, offended, or angered. Irritable means easily annoyed or bothered, and it implies cross and snappish behavior: an irritable clerk, rude and hostile; Impatient and irritable, he was constantly complaining.

What is verbal aggression examples?

Forms of Verbal Aggressiveness Name calling, insults, put-downs. Character attacks, ridicule. Racial epithets. Threats, ultimatums. Nonverbal aggression—rolling the eyes, gritting the teeth, looks of disdain Some Caveats or Qualifiers.

How do you deal with an impossible person?

Believe it or not, you can stay calm, defuse conflict, and keep your dignity.Listen. … Stay calm. … Don’t judge. … Reflect respect and dignity toward the other person. … Look for the hidden need. … Look for others around you who might be able to help. … Don’t demand compliance. … Saying, “I understand,” usually makes things worse.More items…

How do you communicate with an aggressive person?

How to handle hostile and confrontational people.Keep Safe. … Keep Your Distance and Keep Your Options Open. … Keep Your Cool and Avoid Escalation. … Depersonalize and Shift from Reactive to Proactive. … Know Your Fundamental Human Rights. … Utilize Assertive and Effective Communication. … Consider Intervention in Close Relationship.More items…•

What are the 3 types of aggression?

The three aggression types comprised reactive-expressive (i.e., verbal and physical aggression), reactive-inexpressive (e.g., hostility), and proactive-relational aggression (i.e., aggression that can break human relationships, for instance, by circulating malicious rumours).