Which University Did Xuan Zang And I Qing Study At?

Why did Hiuen Tsang came to India?

Hiuen Tsang was the Chinese traveler who visited India in Ancient Times between AD 627-643.

He visited India during the reign of Harshavardhana who came to admire him for his deep devotion towards Buddhism..

What does Xuanzang mean?

The life and adventures of a Chinese monk who made a 17-year journey to bring Buddhist teachings from India to China. Xuanzang subsequently became a main character in the great Chinese epic Journey to the West.

Was China a Hindu country?

The religion itself has a very limited presence in modern mainland China, but archaeological evidence suggests a significant presence of Hinduism in different provinces of medieval China. Hindu influences were also absorbed in the country through the spread of Buddhism over its history.

What type of Traveller was Xuan Zang?

While residing in the city of Luoyang (in Henan in Central China), Xuanzang was ordained as a śrāmaṇera (novice monk) at the age of thirteen. Due to the political and social unrest caused by the fall of the Sui dynasty, he went to Chengdu in Sichuan, where he was ordained as a bhikṣu (full monk) at the age of twenty.

When did Hiuen Tsang visit India?

627 ADHsuan-tsang started his journey to India in 627 AD, traveling overland, and largely following the Silk Road.

Who is the first Traveller to India?

Megasthenes, ambassador of Seleucus Nikator was the first foreign traveller to India.

How many years Hiuen Tsang stayed in India?

fourteen yearsThe journey from China to India was covered by him in about a year. Then he stayed in India for nearly fourteen years.

Who is called the Prince of Traveller?

Known as ‘the prince of travellers,’ his journeys spanned three decades, travelling from the far west of Africa to the far east of Asia. … Ibn Battuta visited most of the countries of the Muslim world at that time including Egypt, Iraq, Persia, Indian and Central Asia.

Who built the Nalanda University?

NalandaWidth490 m (1,600 ft)Area12 ha (30 acres)HistoryBuilderKing Kumaragupta IFounded5th century24 more rows

Who was the first Chinese Traveller to India?

Fa-HienFa Hien or Faxian (AD 399 – 413): Fa-Hien was the first Chinese monk to travel to India in search of great Buddhist scriptures. At the age of sixty-five, he travelled, mostly on foot, from Central China taking the southern route through Shenshen, Dunhuang, Khotan, and then over the Himalayas, to Gandhara and Peshawar.

When did Xuanzang came to India?

Xuanzang decided to go to learn the true teachings of Buddhist, collect Buddhist manuscripts to carry back to China and pay homage to the sacred places associated with Buddha. In 629 CE, Xuanzang decided to travel to India.

Who is the world best Traveller?

Download the new Independent Premium app8 YURI GAGARIN (1934-1968) … 7 FRIDTJOF NANSEN (1861-1930) … 6 CHARLES DARWIN (1809-1882) … 5 CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS (1451-1506) … 4 IBN BATTUTA (1304-1368 OR 1377) … 3 SIR RICHARD BURTON (1821-1890) … 2 XUANZANG (602-644 OR 664) … 1 CAPTAIN JAMES COOK (1728-1779)More items…•

Who found India?

Vasco da GamaVasco da Gama reaches India. Portuguese explorer Vasco de Gama becomes the first European to reach India via the Atlantic Ocean when he arrives at Calicut on the Malabar Coast. Da Gama sailed from Lisbon, Portugal, in July 1497, rounded the Cape of Good Hope, and anchored at Malindi on the east coast of Africa.

What was Xuanzang famous for?

Xuanzang, world-famous for his sixteen-year pilgrimage to India and career as a translator of Buddhist scriptures, is one of the most illustrious figures in the history of scholastic Chinese Buddhism. Born into a scholarly family at the outset of the Tang (T’ang) Dynasty, he enjoyed a classical Confucian education.

How did Fa Xian return to China?

When he had deepened his knowledge of Buddhism and was in possession of sacred texts that were not yet translated into Chinese, he decided to go back to China. … After returning to his homeland, Faxian resumed his scholarly tasks and translated into Chinese the Buddhist texts he had taken so much trouble to bring back.